Tag Archives: biographies

Historical books a plenty August 2013

This is an update on my reading pile which has changed dramatically since I last wrote up the previous update. 

I have before, added books I haven’t even opened the pages of yet.  But this time around I am only going to add the books which I’ve read at least one page of, then at the end of that list I will write up what I hope to start reading before September 1st 2013.

I have read a wonderful biography of a ladies maid life in service to Lady Nancy Astor, I recommend this as a good read to anyone interested in non-celebrities lives; the book I read was “The Ladies Maid” by Rosina Harrison and I marked it as a five star on Goodreads.com

“The Laws of Manifestation” by David Spangler, I am very interested in the law of attraction and cosmic ordering, but although I’ve read 94 pages of this book so far the idea that they rely on God so much puts me off and makes for an uncomfortable read for me – though the book has opened my mind about relying on relationships to assist my needs.  For example, this along with a recommendation by Host Fiona on Jackpotjoy.com I have joined a site called freegle.com where people pass on unwanted things for free, I’ve come across a woman whose giving away 20 saved jam and pickle jars which is useful for our chutney making and we’ve also found several other items we’re interested in there, so, technically, that’s cosmic ordering working for us through the habit of socializing with strangers.

“Sociology; themes and perspectives” by Michael Haralambos, I haven’t moved on from reading this since I last updated it, but at least I’ve read some pages of this book. 

I still owe it to my friend Richard Gentle to read the rest of his book “Whatever you think” as well as that, he is doing a talk on the law of attraction and cosmic ordering tonight on an internet radio show, though I need to ask him further details about that.

“Parallel worlds” by Michio Kaku hasn’t been picked up again since either.

“Full Dark, No Stars” hasn’t progressed either, the book is by Stephen King and lately I feel a little too sensitive for horrors outside of the vampire genre (love vampires, always wanted one as a pet to set on my enemies).

“Dragon Chronicles” by Margaret Weis, I would love to further the read but my wrist got sprained and it’s a huge book to hold – a friend suggested a kindle download, but I don’t enjoy reading that way.

“The Goddess Experience” by Gisele Scanlon is a lovely read but I am loathe to reading more of it because of financial troubles and every time I read a page in that book I want to travel to the place of suggestion and buy something, like Paris for macarons and some little shop in South London for bespoke handbags.

“The art of happiness” by the Dalai Lama hasn’t been picked up lately because I am finding it hard to put myself into a relaxing frame of mind to read it lately.

“Lucky” by Alice Sebold is a difficult read, emotionally, so I will try and read it when I can.

“Below Stairs, the kitchen maid’s memoir” by Margaret Powell was an interesting read, but I will re-read the first three pages again soon and make a start on the entire book, but this may be around four weeks’ time as I over loaned too many books at the library again, despite me promising myself I was only going to get out three this time.

Now for the list of (not even opened books) that I plan to read over the summer holidays. 

“The dragon sitter” by Josh Lacey, I got this out on Henry’s library card (my 3yr old son).

“Speed reading for dummies” by Richard Sutz, this will be a very worthwhile read because of the amount of books I am backlogged with and it gets worse weekly.

“Hubble Bubble” by Jane Lovering, I think, from what I’ve read at the back that it’s a dystopian comedy about witches, but could be wrong?

“Merry England” by William Harrison Ainsworth, I love books like these so it shouldn’t be long before I pick that up to read.

“Sister Queens; Katherine of Aragon and Juana Queen of Castile” By Julia Fox, again I love historical books like these so I am looking forward to reading this, especially as I am watching a lot of Tudor based programs, documentaries and historical dramas lately.

“The Forbidden” by Frank Tallis, unsure what this is supposed to be about, but the back of the book lured me, especially as it seems someone sold their soul in a way that sounds like they didn’t even know they did it, but again, could be wrong.

“Gothic Art” by Andrew Martindale, again I love books based around Gothic art and architecture, though I dislike the religious connotations in most of it.

“Catch-22” by Joseph Heller, I wrote this book down in my “to research” notebook a few weeks ago, but I couldn’t remember why – so I went online and found out why, it was a comedy war book apparently, I think I may have got the recommendation from “Cult Fiction” I read a couple of months ago, but whether or not this is my type of book I don’t know yet.

“The adventure of English” by Melvyn Bragg, still hasn’t been picked up but I have wanted to read this for almost fifteen years now, maybe I should actually start it within the next six weeks?

“The Castle of Otranto” by Horace Walpole, is another book I am interested in but unsure when I will get around to it, I downloaded it on kindle and I must say it’s a reluctant read because of the format and I can’t find it cheap to buy anywhere and my district libraries don’t have it in storage either.

“Dissolution” by C.J Sansom, the first book in the Shardlake series again it’s historical and I think they’re based around Tudor times again so they’ll certainly put me into my element once I start reading them; I bought the whole series for only £8.70 on eBay second-hand, the cheapest out there, I think the cheapest second-hand was available on Amazon for £27 so that’s a bargain indeed!

“Nutmeg” by Maria Goodin, again I read the first few pages of this story and I was hooked, but I had to put it down because it was only meant to be a taster – I can’t wait to finish this book in particular, I could do with nonsensical comedy.

I really hope the speed-reading book will help me read all these books whilst still maintaining the imagination I have when I read (like a TV screen in my head) but I don’t think it’s designed to do that, rather than to just get the words in your head and your brain slowly processes it all after you’ve read things so you can see it like a TV program later, or have I got the idea of speed-reading all wrong?

Well anyway, at this time I think the laws of manifestation will be completed by Tomorrow night, if not then I will be starting on the dragon-sitter and both books will be likely to be finished by Thursday the latest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Smoke & Mirrors by Neil Gaiman

I read this book in January 2013; I still remember some of the stories as clear as day.  I felt it would be good to put up previously read works on this site, because I don’t read enough fiction regularly to sustain this part of the blog, I mostly read non-fiction works based on social history, religion, the occult, psychology, true stories and biographies.

For those of you who have never read Neil Gaiman or know about the book “Smoke and Mirrors” it is an anthology of fantasy, horror and dark fantasy short stories and in my opinion, prose. 

Anyway, first up is “the wedding present” I don’t remember much about this story at all, other than I remember disliking it, but I can’t remember why.  I do plan to re-read this book at the end of this year for revising what I think is good and bad about it all, as I am trying to teach myself how to read critically, so re-reading this story will help me remember why I didn’t like it.

The next story I liked, it was humorous, “chivalry” A little old lady goes into a charity shop and buys a chalice and she is soon pestered by a time traveling knight who declares the chalice is rather special and tries to get it off her for several weeks, she eventually relents with a surprising ending.

“Nicholas Was” is next, a very short story, or was it really prose?  I don’t know what it was, but I do remember it, and it was confusing, although I did like the imagery it portrayed.

“The Price” oh my goodness was that a scary tale, I felt like crying for the cat.  I think the cat was based on some kind of protective angel, but that’s well hidden in the story if that’s what the cat was.  A brilliant tale, loved it, and I loved the audio of it too which is free and can be found at this website www.neilgaiman.co.uk/smokeandmirrors/audio

Another of my favorite was “Troll Bridge” I think almost every fantasy writer has written their own variation of this story at some point; I know Terry Pratchett has, although I’ve never read that one yet.  Neil Gaiman’s Troll Bridge was in my opinion, unique; I found it really thoughtful and inspiring.  I sometimes hoped that I could crawl under such bridge and make a deal like that, but would I really want to?  Who knows…?

“Don’t ask Jack” bought back nightmares of my childhood, that’s all I am going to say about this story.  I don’t like remembering it, to be honest.  In fact, I wasn’t comfortable with the story so much, I had to put the book down for two months before I could read the story that came after it, and that was because I forgot the previous tale. 

“The goldfish pool and other stories” Brilliant, I was so happy I picked this book up again after abandoning it, this was a great story, touching, haunting, fantastic.  I was really upset it was a short story; I could have read hundreds of pages of this work easily. 

“Eaten” I don’t remember this story either and I can’t remember if I liked it or not – sorry.

Again, one I loved “The white road” the imagery in my head was so lucid, I adored that.  I tend to think of actors or people I know when I read books and I was seeing actors and actresses from “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” and “The Aristocrats” TV mini-series in 1999 one actor in particular was actually playing a Mr Fox, Alun Armstrong, he was playing Mr Fox in my mind when reading this story and the girl was a blond haired Winona Ryder for some reason.  The other actors and actresses from those movies and series that I was seeing in my head were there purely as spectators of the revelation that was being said between Mr Fox and the girl.

I was a wonderful story; I loved it, such passion and a delight to read, but am I being too bold? Ha-ha.

“Queen of knives” and “The case of the departure of Miss Finch” other delightful reads.  I loved them, they reminded me of one of my favorite Hammer horrors, “The Vampire Circus”, and they also had a similar air to “The Night Circus” by Erin Morgenstern.  I too, almost wrote a book similar to all four of these examples when I was fifteen years old.  A story based around a circus of the night, traveling vampire gypsies picking off locals at their stops, turning some, training some, it was a good idea I thought, but at the time I was going through a turmoil.  My brother had friends in publishing, they were at his house having a dinner party and I was also invited, they asked to view my work so arranged another dinner with my brother and I gave them some of my work, unfortunately I never got them back and they plagiarized my work, unfortunately still, I had no proof they did this because when I lost my completed work I lost heart in re-writing it all and burned the notes I had gathered over the two years it took me to complete it. So basically they got off Scot free and I’ve nothing to prove in court, so my loss I suppose.  My brother also worked behind the scenes of major film companies, so needless to say they did make a movie out of what I wrote, but made minor alterations, I won’t mention the movie here or the people, because I don’t like making a fuss, especially when I cannot offer proof.  The story was different to my gypsy vampire idea, but was vampire themed nonetheless, just this was the point of no return for me until I reached twenty one and had confidence in writing again, by this time I had forgot the idea, I only remembered the idea after reading those stories.

“Changes” I don’t remember this story either regrettably.

“The daughter of owls” now that was a beautiful fairy-tale in my opinion. 

“Shoggoth’s old peculiar” made me smile because it made me think he based the story on my family, who live on the edge of the Welsh and English border, they run a pub which resembles an eighteenth century tavern and I’m sorry to say they have toad-like faces and an old fashion air about them.  They are constantly cribbing about hiking tourists in their area, particularly Americans, which made this story feel it was made especially for me.  Obviously it wasn’t, Neil Gaiman doesn’t know me from Adam, but still, it felt special.

“Virus” I didn’t like either.

“Looking for the girl” I disliked too.  Reminded me a little bit of one of my exes, made me feel this story was based on his future life.

“Only the end of the world again” I liked, was it a sequel to one of the above stories I wondered?  Or more than one – I sense an air of “Shoggoth’s old peculiar” but also “the white road”.  I loved the combination if I am right, it worked amazingly well.

I think the “Bay wolf” is also like the above review, though I am confused, because I am trying to remember all the stories from only four months back and it’s difficult, particularly as I am writing this review on a day that my headaches are mild and wondering whether or not they should get worse and become the usual migraines.

“Fifteen painted cards from a vampire tarot” was also good, many stories in one.  Again, this was something I was thinking about writing as an inclusion to my traveling vampire gypsies when I was a teenager, another reason was because an old horror movie with Donald Sutherland inspired me a few years previous called “Dr Terror House of Horrors”. 

“We can get them for you wholesale” was both hilarious and bleak; I never laughed out as loud as I did when reading this story.  I truly recommend it for people who have a sick sense of humor like me!

“One Life, Furnished in Early Moorcock” and “Cold Colours” I don’t remember these stories either unfortunately.

“The sweeper of dreams” was also beautifully written and after reading it, knowing I’ve ignored my love for writing for almost two years solid, I began to wonder if the sweeper of dreams came and visited me and stole my muse away or not?  But obviously it hadn’t, because I’ve started to write again, though, this time, my muse focuses mostly on poetry, not stories, like before.

I despised “Foreign Parts” it’s really not my kind of story at all. 

“Vampire Sestina” was brilliant and again, too short.

“Mouse” I couldn’t remember much about mouse either.

“The sea change” was a good read too, for what I remember and that’s not quite much at all, ha-ha.

“How do you think it feels” I liked the story and I hoped for more, but no.  Sometimes I think Neil Gaiman lacks the confidence to make some of his short stories into novels, it’s like he doesn’t believe in them so he makes them short but sweet.

“When we went to see the end of the world” that was a confusing read.

“Desert Wind” was nice.

I don’t remember “tastings” either.

“In the end” now that was very thought provoking and again, made me pause on the book for a fortnight whilst I thought things through and read “Enoch” and a few other non-fiction stories, for absolutely no other reason than to try and confirm my own beliefs in some strange inane kind of way.

“Babycakes” the title attracted me because when I was in college a friend of mine thought it would be good to have a name for each other, a pet name, so she came up with the name “Babycakes” I was baby and she was cakes.  She called me baby because I lacked experience of the world and she felt very motherly towards me.  Regrettably, the story isn’t as sweet as the one I just said above about me and my friend; it’s haunting in a bad way, terrifying because that could become a truth and I felt bad that I had read it, like it’s shameful.

“Murder mysteries” was beautiful, I liked the story outline.

Now, here comes my favorite story of the entire book “Snow, glass, apples” Neil Gaiman’s take on Snow White and it’s wonderful.  Unique, tragic, he saw what I saw in the story, not a victim but a spoiled dangerous little brat, that’s what I’ve always seen snow white as, but oh, it’s wonderful how he mingled this story with vampirism and victimization of the queen.  A pure work of genius!

This book was 50/50 in my opinion, 50% bad and 50% good, but the good bits are excellent, they are unique and imaginative and I love them, they inspire me to write my own stuff.

Thank you Neil Gaiman!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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