Tag Archives: hunting

The Wolf

Darkness has fallen and the moon arises to light his way from the sky.

Gently he walks in concealment with his dark and sly little eyes.

He tiptoes through the night forest crunching dead leaves underfoot; slowly he crawls like a stealthy, clever, hunting crook.

Sniffing the ground tracking the bait, to see what luck will have him take!

Which meal is he to find today?

Sniffing the paths of many preys!

The scent of live flesh gets stronger now and he eagerly prepares his snare.

There it is, back turned from the wolf, the prey doesn’t know that his there.

Slowly the night hunter creeps behind, ready to pounce and ready to dine.

The wolves jaw snaps round the neck sharp.

Tearing it to pieces without a heart!

Triumphant with his hunt, he calls!

Barking loudly about his Trawl, calling his family to dine with him, the flesh of the victim, it pleases him.

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Kithara (part 1)

Kithara knew this barren land like the back of her hand, it might seem like one endless desert to anybody else, but she knew every little thing about it; where to hunt for lizards, where to find grubs and underground water, and more importantly, how to tame the wildlife surrounding it.

When you looked closely at Kithara’s land, you’d notice it wasn’t as barren as you’d first think.  It was brimming with life and that life fed Kithara’s body, mind and soul.

Kithara was barely fourteen and running through the desert, hopping from rock to rock hunting with her cheetahs, she was very handy with a knife too.  She was the talk of her camp.

You see, Kithara didn’t have a village; she came from a nomadic tribe deep within the wastelands of Banouro, they’d travel the entire desert and occasionally would settle just outside big cities and citadels, the stretch they’d travel regularly was at least a thousand miles in diameter, yet nothing was new to Kithara in any place they’d stay.

One particularly afternoon after Kithara had gone fishing in the oasis she noticed a group of men on horseback all clothed in black and dark purple in thick layers from head to toe, some wore head wraps and others wore fur square hats and just one man chose to wear nothing atop his head, he was an unusual man, one of red hair, quite rare, especially in this country, he must have been a foreigner.  The other gentlemen he was with were semi-local, settlers from the edge of Banouro on the North to North West side.

She’d noticed that the strange men were lining up her tribes people, picking at them and pointing at them and rearranging them quite aggressively.

Then amongst the crowd, she saw her father, a big lump of a man, with a bald head, and large mouth and nose.  He must have been preparing to butcher some meat before the arrivals because he was wearing his leather sleeveless top and it was too clean for him to have been working on something.  Then he saw her mother being taken away with some other women and they were made to stand in a circle around three men and a very old woman dressed in purple and jewels that were looking at them.

Kithara didn’t know who these people were, but she could guess.  She had heard years before of people just like her tribe, people taken away from the barren lands and made to work, whole families forced apart, never to be seen again, or, until at least, they’d leave the workplace.

Suddenly, there was a commotion over by the female circle, Kithara had noticed her mother screaming, shouting, ranting and raving at the old lady.

The old lady looked at her mother in disgust, then did some motion with her hands and her mother was immediately pulled out of the circle and lined up next to other old people from her tribe, the old people were chained together to a carriage of horses, yet no one seemed to have tied her mother in the same way, instead, the red man was called over to seemingly talk to Kithara’s mother.

Kithara’s mother looked up at him doe eyed and silent, then forthwith he took his sword out of his left sheath and sliced her throat open right before her eyes, her mother fell immediately bleeding to death staining the red man’s felt shoes and soaking them through, replenishing the already red dye.

Find out another time what Kithara will do…

© Tina Cousins 2013

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taboos, cliche and offense

I’ve known some people who reckon they’ve got some very good ideas for a book, but, they’re afraid of offending someone with what seems to be socially taboo subjects.  These subjects range from, religion bashing, racism, a sexual orientation the author personally doesn’t have; a cliche idea of a group of people and even in some cases they’re afraid of the dialogue being wrong, not to mention class discrimination, bullying and abuse.  If that’s the main theme of your story, then why be afraid of the response?  You cannot please everybody all of the time, you are bound to offend somebody with something you may not have even thought of.

I have read books where if I read more than ten swear words before the second chapter I hang the book up if the character isn’t known for some kind of aggression earlier on.  That offends me, to the majority of the public it seems, they aren’t bothered by this kind of writing, but I am.

I have read books where they’ve done mindless violence to an animal that serves no purpose to the book, I sometimes reluctantly read on, but I am offended nonetheless.  I understand some people are offended of hunting, although I hate animal violence; I am not opposing hunting if it is for food and food only!

Some people seem to think abuse and neglect autobiographies should be removed from the shelves, I personally don’t.  For me, it helps me to overcome the abuse I experienced as a child, in some ways it can also help me get into the mind of my abusers.  It also helps me to respect the welfare more, I used to feel they’ve failed me, they had in a way, but it wasn’t entirely their fault, they tried their hardest for me, but they couldn’t gather enough evidence to pull me from that situation.  When I ask the people opposing these books why they’re against them, they believe that it might give abusers ideas of what to do to the children they’re in contact with, it could help them cover things up more by learning things from the abused child’s perspectives.  This is a serious concern, but I truly believe it helps victims more than it creates more predators.

From what I know of my abusers and from those I’ve read about, abuse comes spontaneously and compulsively, almost without plan, abusers seem to be opportunists rather than planners.

People who neglect do tend to plan on neglecting the child sometimes, or may have mental health problems where they didn’t realize or mean to neglect their child, in my case, my mother was too busy to actually sit back and think “Oh my God, my daughter is genuinely sick, got to take her to the doctors”, my mother was a career woman who truly believed that everybody was trying to hold her back and that I was hungry for attention and needed to be stamped on so I don’t get in her way, so she did medically neglect me to the extent I lost all the hearing in my right ear and needed emergency surgery to prevent an infection going into the brain, it was eating its way through the bone.  There were other medical problem she chose to ignore, for example, losing her temper and picking me up wrong and dropping me head first onto a concrete floor, a huge lump appeared on my head and I complained of not seeing properly and being dizzy and vomiting, she ignored me as making a scene to embarrass her in front of a friend and sent me to bed, for weeks I could barely see until a teacher became frustrated that I wasn’t understanding anything in class and seemed to have severely gone backwards since the previous term, drastically so and felt maybe I needed my eyes tested.  It turned out, I needed very strong glasses, I blame the accident on it, I was fine before and the reason why it took so long to pick up?  My mother wouldn’t let me go back to school until the bump had completely gone, claiming I caught a nasty virus and I had to look after myself at home all day whilst she and dad worked, this was before the welfare got called in.

This aside, all in all, there is a big difference between abuse and neglect, which isn’t widely known.  I was unlucky enough to be the victim of both but I won’t add much more detail than that here I have another blog which I will be started up soon, as a type of therapy for me and I’ll update you on that site another day.

So are these books wrong?  Are they right?  I can’t say, but for me they help me, for others it might be detrimental, but who are we to judge?

Salman Rushdie is considered a living legend in literature, yet his books sparked him to become the victim of a fatwa.  Yet he didn’t mean to bring about a negative response to what he hoped would be viewed as a book of comedy.  Some people just don’t have a sense of humor when it comes to their religion, but we can’t help that.  I we cannot control people; we cannot control whether they like our writing or not, so why sit back and worry?  Yes, OK, you could become the next literary victim of a fatwa or you could be murdered by a reader who hates you, you can’t sit back wondering what if, should I, shan’t I, because you’ll go crazy.  Just write and leave the criticism to the readers, you will be criticized a lot, but you will also be praised a lot too, you can’t tell which way the table will turn.

If you’re book has your characters having lesbian sex between two aliens whilst laughing their heads off at all our worlds religion and leaders and cultures and you individually pick out some examples to put in your book, you will offend a lot of people from those categories, but will that make it a bad book?  No, it will still be humorous, to those outside of the categories or those within who actually have a sense of humor.  So write it!

More later…

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The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey

I read this about a week ago, it was the last novel I had the pleasure of finishing and I rated it 5 stars on goodreads.com

The story is a modern and westernized version of a Russian fairytale called Snegurochka where an elderly couple, alone in the Alaskan wilderness longs for a child of their own and it seems as though by magic one appears from the snow, but they were not allowed to be too close to her.

It is a strange and compelling relationship and a very endearing powerfully emotional tale.  The characters are strong and wonderful, the type of people that make me smile and seem very real, in fact sometimes this novel can bring home some horrendous realities based on human survival and the harshness of our economy.  This novel was based in the 1920s and you can definitely see that the author has done her homework on that era.

I suggest this as a must read for anybody who loves reading about descriptive landscapes, stories based on snow, hunting, childless couples, innocence and magic.  This will also suit people who are interested in the Baba Yaga as she is mentioned a few times, this also has some Russian characters which can also feel enchanting to some too.

This story does not suit people who cannot take gory details, particularly of hunting, this is a definite no-no for those who cannot bear to hear of any animal being killed, though these hunting descriptions were mostly based on survival and food as opposed to pleasure or the fur trade, I understand it can offend some.

Generally I loved the story, it was magical in every sense and unlike other stories it went in the direction I wanted it to all the way until the end, then the end left me speechless.  Let’s hope it does the same for you.

Tell me what you thought of this story.

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